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The Half-Marathon Coach: Jane Vongvorachoti

This professional runner believes variety is the key to success.

Running is an excellent mode of exploration when visiting new cities. And signing up for a race in a spot you’re planning to visit is even more ideal as you’re guaranteed a set route and fuel along the way. The London Landmarks Half Marathon on March 25th 2018 checks those boxes—and brings it to the next level, taking participants past Big Ben, The Tower of London, and the London Eye as well as quirky and hidden landmarks such as Oscar Wilde’s memorial. To commemorate the special event, for which Equinox is the official fitness and training partner, we’ll be introducing you to our London-based Equinox run crew including personal trainers who specialize in running and even a world-class professional marathoner who coaches novice and elite athletes alike. Take note of their favorite exercises, training strategies, restaurant recommendations, and more. 

Last week, we heard from Rory Knight. This week, we’re featuring Jane Vongvorachoti.

Originally hailing from New Hyde Park, New York, Jane Vongvorachoti moved to London to be a Tier 3 trainer at Equinox Kensington. She specializes in coaching runners from novice to elite, at distances from 5K to marathon. She's run seven marathons herself, including at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games (her time was 2:47:27). She believes that running a variety of races of different lengths on different training surfaces is the key to staying strong and healthy as a runner. 

What’s your favorite strength exercise for runners?

"Stability ball single-leg bridges."

How would you describe your running philosophy?

"Be the biggest believer in your capabilities because you are stronger and faster than you think."

What’s the piece of running gear you couldn’t live without?

"Zensah compression socks are a must for hard workouts, long runs, and races."

How are you training for the London Landmarks Half-Marathon?

"I am working with a coach and training through this race for the London marathon (in April). My workouts include some kind of speed session, either fartlek or tempo, a couple days of easier effort runs and double runs on some days, along with a long run, which can have pace changes or a steady pace on different terrain. I also always have strength training at minimum once a week."

Music or no music?

"I don’t listen to music so I can focus on my form and rhythm. I need to listen to my body as I run."

What’s your go-to recovery technique post-race?

"Icing my legs and putting them up after a race is very important to getting them to recover. Good nutrition afterwards is also critical to help repair muscle tears that occur from a race."