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New Year's resolutions from Equinox experts

I resolve to: nurture my joy.

“My 2020 resolution is to hike and paraglide in four countries: the United States, Brazil, Italy, and Switzerland. The solitude and freedom I feel during these activities regenerate me mentally and emotionally in ways that allow me to appreciate the life, atmosphere, landscapes, and cloudscapes around me. I believe a resolution should ultimately be a pursuit of joy, and hiking and paragliding bring me genuine happiness.

On January 1, I will start a two-month paragliding training program that I designed. During the summer, I’ll take to the skies for twice weekly flight practice in San Bernardino, California. Here, I will work with my instructor to earn my P3 pilot license with accomplishments in ridge soaring and turbulence, which will allow me to fly internationally.”

—Laird

I resolve to: treat myself like a client.

“In 2020, I will be consistent in scheduling my days from start to finish, essentially using tools and strategies I ask my clients to use to maximize efficiency.  

At the end of December, I will write out a new four-week workout program for myself and give myself habits to track. I'll put everything in my calendar. Shoulder rehab and prehab will happen four times per week. I'll add reminders to pack the next day's meals at 8 p.m. on weekdays. To make sure I get enough regen, I'll set a 9 p.m. bedtime alarm every night. By planning this way, I will waste less time on last-minute programming and stolen glances at Instagram.”

Patrick Hageman, Tier X coach at The Loop in Chicago

I resolve to: create more time for cool-downs.

“Although my workout routine is pretty consistent, I often have to rush to a session with a client afterward. That takes away from the time I should spend on prehab and mobility work during cool-downs to optimize recovery and prevent injury. If I skip that part of my training, I end up feeling tight.

I usually allocate ninety minutes for my workout, but I tend to spend my rest periods socializing with trainers and members. This makes my workout last longer than it should, inevitably causing me to skip my cool-down. In 2020, I will monitor my rest intervals by setting a timer on my watch or phone so I always have time for it.”

Mamou Kouyate, Tier X coach at East 74th Street in New York City

I resolve to: be coached.

“Four times a week for the next two months, I am going to have another coach plan my workouts. Being guided by an outside eye gives you insight into what they see, which offers more opportunities to improve. (If I had the choice, I would prefer to focus mostly on my strengths.)

I also want to have an idea of what my clients feel like trusting me with their movement. One of my friends will do the same workouts and I'll text her a checkmark after I complete each session to hold myself accountable.”

Bryant Thomas, Tier 3+ coach at Hudson Yards in New York City

I resolve to: eat more, and better.

“This year, I ate too much sugar and not enough calories overall to maintain high energy levels. I got in the habit of eating a high-sugar breakfast, a low-quality carb lunch, and small portions, then I’d work out four hours later without fueling. Since I was consistently in a caloric deficit, I wasn’t able to progress to heavier weights or more sets and reps. By using a Precision Nutrition calorie estimator, I realized I should be eating approximately 3,300 calories a day, which was 500 to 1,000 more than my average.

In the New Year, I will eat larger meals by adding a palm of protein and handful of carbs to each. For example, I may add a serving of chicken to my breakfast omelet, black beans to my lunch salad, and hummus and brown rice to my dinner. To track progress, I’ll note my energy levels when I wake up, in the middle of the day, and when I get home in the evening. I will also make sure that I am slowly increasing my load in strength workouts—a sign I'm eating well enough to build strength.”

Steve Ferrah, Tier X coach at The Loop