walking-workout

WALKING AS A WORKOUT

Athletes don’t do it enough.

THE GIST
It’s good to speed up during everyday activities like grocery shopping or taking your dog out, but you should also incorporate power walking into your official training plan, says John Quartuccio, Tier 3+ trainer at West 92nd Street in New York City.
EXPERT INSIGHT
Walking makes a routine full of HIIT, sprints, and other demanding sessions more well-rounded. That’s important: Working your heart rate at varying intensities on different days is crucial for improving performance, avoiding plateaus, and dodging injury for all athletes, Quartuccio says. 

A new study even shows that metabolically, moving at a cadence of 100 steps per minute (or 3 mph) counts as moderate intensity training. Raise your pace to 130 steps per minute (about 4 mph), and researchers say you’re likely logging a vigorous workout.
THE BOTTOM LINE
Swap one or two steady-state runs or active recovery workouts per week with a power walk of 30 to 60 minutes each, Quartuccio says. Aim for up to 4 mph on the treadmill or a heart rate between 130 and 150 if walking outside.

Photo: Erik Umphery/thelicensingproject.com