bone health, appetite, sitting too much, health, research

SITTING CAN INCREASE APPETITE

New research suggests cells in your bones are to blame.

Every athlete knows that education is a crucial part of performance. Sport and exercise research, insight from top trainers, science, and technology help you to better understand your body so you can craft a healthier lifestyle, workouts, and recovery plan.

In our daily news series, experts address some of the latest fitness research, nutrition, style, and health stories.


THE SCIENCE
Researchers might have found an explanation for why sitting is tied to weight gain and poor health. A new study on mice led to the hypothesis that it has to do with gravity sensors in the bones of our legs, called osteocytes, which act as a bodyweight scale.
EXPERT INSIGHT

Osteocytes are a type of cell that sense outside force on bone and adapt accordingly, explains study author Jan-Åke Gustafsson, MD, Ph.D., founding director of the Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling at the University of Houston. These cells help regulate bone mass but the study results suggest they also do so for fat mass—at least in mice, he says.

Since sitting removes the force of our body weight from our bones, osteocytes in our legs mistakenly think we weigh less and try to get us back to homeostasis by sending signals that increase our appetite, Gustafsson explains.

THE BOTTOM LINE
Gustaffsson and his team still need to test the theory in humans, but the discovery in mice is an exciting prospect that could help explain how our body regulates weight gain. Until then, move more throughout the day to remind your bones what your natural weight feels like.