rejuvalac

Daily Wisdom: Try Drinking Rejuvelac

It could help with GI issues and only requires two ingredients to make.

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TODAY'S TOPIC: A DRINK TO RIVAL KOMBUCHA

THE SCIENCE
An increasingly popular tonic, rejuvelac is made from fermented sprouted grains. The bright, tangy, citrusy drink tastes similar to lemonade (but is tart not sweet). The liquid can be used for making vegan cheese, sauces, and breads, or it can be consumed by itself as a beverage.
EXPERT INSIGHT

Experts speculate that it acts like kombucha (fermented tea), which provides a host of nutrients that are good for your gut. “Grains can be high in certain nutrients, but we don’t know yet how much of these make it into the beverage product,” explains Jennifer Senecal, a New York City-based nutritionist. According to the textbook Contemporary Nutrition, the drink is generally rich in protein, healthy carbs, phosphates, and vitamins B, C, E, and K.


THE BOTTOM LINE
There are a few reasons for choosing rejuvelac over kombucha, says Senecal. The former contains strains of lactobacillus bacteria, which " could be effective in treating a host of conditions including IBS and high cholesterol,” she notes. And unlike kombucha, rejuvelac doesn’t contain any traces of alcohol. Look for it at local health food stores or try making your own.