recovery workout

The Recovery Workout

For athletes, it’s time to rethink rest days.

Results are achieved not just by working hard, but also by resting hard. “It's important to think of all of the time that you aren't training as recovery time,” says Tier X manager Justin Jacobs. “Proper nutrition, hydration, and sleep impact recovery immensely.” But, you can also do what experts call recovery workouts—sessions focused on small muscle recruitment, and mobility and regeneration work designed to balance the autonomic nervous system (the part that regulates breathing, heart rate, and other things you don’t consciously control). The result: “A body that can move better, feel better, and be more resilient,” says Michael Dalcourt, founder of the Institute of Motion

Dalcourt predicted that these recovery sessions would become more popular in 2017, with trainers leading their clients through hour-long sessions. Get ahead of the worthy trend and add a recovery workout, like the below from Jacobs, into your routine for every one to two high-intensity strength or interval workouts you do. Note that it’s still called a “workout” because it is indeed a workout—and it would not qualify as recovery for someone who does not lift weights normally. “What constitutes recovery is relative,” says Jacobs. “If you are new to exercise or don't regularly resistance train, anything loaded is going to feel like a workout.” 

Still, you can adjust this recovery routine based on your fitness level. “We are monitoring intensity through heart rate (wear a monitor and ensure yours stays below 150 beats per minute) and by keeping the load light (you should work with weights that are 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max),” says Jacobs. “There are also built-in restful poses at the end of each circuit to bring the heart rate back down while increasing mobility.”

And remember, one full rest day is still recommended.

PREP WORK:

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

Lie on stomach with hands crossed so that forehead rests on them. Take deep breaths, exhaling down into lower belly.

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)

Foam roll ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper/middle back.


Results are achieved not just by working hard, but also by resting hard. “It's important to think of all of the time that you aren't training as recovery time,” says Tier 4 Tier 4 is now called Tier X!! J manager Justin Jacobs. “Proper nutrition, hydration, and sleep impact recovery immensely.” But, you can also do what experts call recovery workouts—sessions focused on small muscle recruitment, and mobility and regeneration work designed to balance the autonomic nervous system (the part that regulates breathing, heart rate, and other things you don’t consciously control). The result: “A body that can move better, feel better, and be more resilient,” says Michael Dalcourt, founder of the Institute of Motion

 

Dalcourt predicted that these recovery sessions would become more popular in 2017, with trainers leading their clients through hour-long sessions. Get ahead of the worthy trend and add a recovery workout, like the below from Jacobs, into your routine for every one to two high-intensity strength or interval workouts you do. Note that it’s still called a “workout” because it is indeed a workout—and it would not qualify as recovery for someone who does not lift weights normally. “What constitutes recovery is relative,” says Jacobs. “If you are new to exercise or don't regularly resistance train, anything loaded is going to feel like a workout.” 

 

Still, you can adjust this recovery routine based on your fitness level. “We are monitoring intensity through heart rate (wear a monitor and ensure yours stays below 150 beats per minute) and by keeping the load light (you should work with weights that are 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max),” says Jacobs. “There are also built-in restful poses at the end of each circuit to bring the heart rate back down while increasing mobility.”


And remember, one full rest day is still recommended.

 

PREP WORK:

 

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

Lie on stomach with hands crossed so that forehead rests on them. Take deep breaths, exhaling down into lower belly.

 

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)

Foam roll ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper/middle back.

 

WORKOUT:

In the circuits below, monitor your heart rate to ensure it doesn’t go over 150 beats per minuteCC: Might be too late to add for publishing, but if we can find out and add later in the day, is there a way to guesstimate this if you don’t have a HRM? Any other little test or level on a scale of say 1 to 5 or somesuch? If it does, take a rest in the finisher pose (a squat hold for 1 minute; a Brettzel, described below, for 2 minutes). For weighted moves, use a kettlebell that is 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max.

 

CIRCUIT 1

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes of rest between rounds.

 

Alternating Scorpion Reaches (6 per side)

Start in a push-up position. Bring the right knee past the opposite wrist while you flex and rotate the spine. Bring the hips up and back into a V while the right foot travels in a circular motion out and your head pushes back between straight elbows. The right leg stays bent at 90 degrees while your left leg stays as long as possible. Think of opening the hips flat toward a wall behind you while pressing the right hand into the floor. Hold this position for about 5 seconds before returning to the start position and repeating on the opposite side. [SM, THIS ONE IS REALLY TOUGH TO GET A VISUAL OF WITHOUT THE IMAGE. HERE IS WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3ny0I0NozwI WILL ADUST THE COPY ABOVE ONCE I SEE THE GIF.]

Half Kneel Stretch with Rotation and Reach (8 per side)
Start with right knee on the ground directly under the hips with the left foot on the floor directly underneath the left knee. Place both hands behind your head with the elbows pressed back. Imagine your hips have flashlights on them. Point the flashlights toward the ceiling and straight forward. Maintain this hip position while you rotate your right elbow toward the left, rotating the thoracic spine. Once you've rotated, reach both arms toward the ceiling behind you. Return your hands behind the head, square your shoulders to the front, and repeat. 

Alternating Turkish Get Up (2 per side) [SM, THIS DESCRIPTION ISN’T READING RIGHT TO ME. I WENT BACK TO JUSTIN.]

Lying on right side, grip kettlebell with both hands and pull into chest. Roll onto back and press arm straight up. Left arm and leg will be flat to the ground at a 45-degree angle. Right knee will be bent, right foot on the floor. Keeping gaze on kettlebell, press right foot into floor and roll onto left forearm. Next, extend left arm so that weight is planted into left hand. Sweep left leg back so that toes are tucked underneath foot and left knee rests on ground next to left hand on ground. Take left hand off floor and bring hips and shoulders to vertical. Square off hips, knees, and shoulders. Change gaze to look forward. Press into right heel and stand up to a fully locked out position. Reverse steps to get back down to floor. Alternate sides by dragging kettlebell on floor over head, lying on right side hugging kettlebell to chest.

 

Kettlebell Single Leg Deadlift (8 per side)

Stand with feet together and hold kettlebell with right hand in front of thigh, arm extended and palm facing left. Bend left knee slightly as you bend forward from hips, extending right leg to hip height behind you as you lower the kettlebell toward floor. Rise up to starting position and repeat. Switch sides.

Assisted Bodyweight Squat Hold (1 minute) 

Hold a bodyweight squat position with feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing forward. Turn feet out a bit if needed. Using an anchor (a bar or pole) for support, drive knees away from each other, and bring quads below parallel. Keep spine straight by pushing down with hands into anchor.

 

CIRCUIT 2

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes rest between rounds.

 

Bear Crawls Forward and Backward (25 meters)

Start on all fours on the ground (in a quadruped position). Lift knees off ground and crawl forward with right hand and left leg, then left hand and right leg.

 

ViPR Curtsy Lunge with Tilt (8 per side) 

Stand with feet together holding an upright ViPR with one end on the floor; both hands on the other side. Lunge left foot behind you as if you were going to curtsy. At the same time, tilt ViPR in same direction as back foot. Body creates ‘C.’ Keep spine long. Return to start; repeat on other side. Alternate sides. 

 

ViPR Lateral Lunge with Thoracic Rotation (8 per side)

Stand with feet together holding the ends of a ViPR to chest. Take a lunging step directly to right side. Keeping left leg long, sit back into right hip as you shift weight toward right side. Maintain position of lower body while rotating upper body right, ideally getting ViPR perpendicular to floor and ceiling. Drive off of right leg and step back to left leg to return to standing position. Repeat in opposite direction.

 

Cardio of your choice (5 minutes at 130 to 140 beats per minute)

 

Brettzel (1 minute per side)

Begin laying on right side with head supported by a foam pad. Take right hand and grab left knee, bringing it to belly button-height. Grab ankle of right leg behind back with left hand. Use a towel or strap if necessary. Inhale into belly, and on the exhale rotate toward left hand. Cycle through this progression a couple of times until shoulder is in contact with the ground. If it’s too difficult to get shoulder down, elevate flexed leg with towels. Repeat on the other side. 

 

COOL DOWN

 

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

 

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)

 

 

Results are achieved not just by working hard, but also by resting hard. “It's important to think of all of the time that you aren't training as recovery time,” says Tier 4 Tier 4 is now called Tier X!! J manager Justin Jacobs. “Proper nutrition, hydration, and sleep impact recovery immensely.” But, you can also do what experts call recovery workouts—sessions focused on small muscle recruitment, and mobility and regeneration work designed to balance the autonomic nervous system (the part that regulates breathing, heart rate, and other things you don’t consciously control). The result: “A body that can move better, feel better, and be more resilient,” says Michael Dalcourt, founder of the Institute of Motion

 

Dalcourt predicted that these recovery sessions would become more popular in 2017, with trainers leading their clients through hour-long sessions. Get ahead of the worthy trend and add a recovery workout, like the below from Jacobs, into your routine for every one to two high-intensity strength or interval workouts you do. Note that it’s still called a “workout” because it is indeed a workout—and it would not qualify as recovery for someone who does not lift weights normally. “What constitutes recovery is relative,” says Jacobs. “If you are new to exercise or don't regularly resistance train, anything loaded is going to feel like a workout.” 

 

Still, you can adjust this recovery routine based on your fitness level. “We are monitoring intensity through heart rate (wear a monitor and ensure yours stays below 150 beats per minute) and by keeping the load light (you should work with weights that are 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max),” says Jacobs. “There are also built-in restful poses at the end of each circuit to bring the heart rate back down while increasing mobility.”


And remember, one full rest day is still recommended.

 

PREP WORK:

 

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

Lie on stomach with hands crossed so that forehead rests on them. Take deep breaths, exhaling down into lower belly.

 

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)

Foam roll ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper/middle back.

 

WORKOUT:

In the circuits below, monitor your heart rate to ensure it doesn’t go over 150 beats per minuteCC: Might be too late to add for publishing, but if we can find out and add later in the day, is there a way to guesstimate this if you don’t have a HRM? Any other little test or level on a scale of say 1 to 5 or somesuch? If it does, take a rest in the finisher pose (a squat hold for 1 minute; a Brettzel, described below, for 2 minutes). For weighted moves, use a kettlebell that is 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max.

 

CIRCUIT 1

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes of rest between rounds.

 

Alternating Scorpion Reaches (6 per side)

Start in a push-up position. Bring the right knee past the opposite wrist while you flex and rotate the spine. Bring the hips up and back into a V while the right foot travels in a circular motion out and your head pushes back between straight elbows. The right leg stays bent at 90 degrees while your left leg stays as long as possible. Think of opening the hips flat toward a wall behind you while pressing the right hand into the floor. Hold this position for about 5 seconds before returning to the start position and repeating on the opposite side. [SM, THIS ONE IS REALLY TOUGH TO GET A VISUAL OF WITHOUT THE IMAGE. HERE IS WHAT IT LOOKS LIKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D3ny0I0NozwI WILL ADUST THE COPY ABOVE ONCE I SEE THE GIF.]

Half Kneel Stretch with Rotation and Reach (8 per side)
Start with right knee on the ground directly under the hips with the left foot on the floor directly underneath the left knee. Place both hands behind your head with the elbows pressed back. Imagine your hips have flashlights on them. Point the flashlights toward the ceiling and straight forward. Maintain this hip position while you rotate your right elbow toward the left, rotating the thoracic spine. Once you've rotated, reach both arms toward the ceiling behind you. Return your hands behind the head, square your shoulders to the front, and repeat. 

Alternating Turkish Get Up (2 per side) [SM, THIS DESCRIPTION ISN’T READING RIGHT TO ME. I WENT BACK TO JUSTIN.]

Lying on right side, grip kettlebell with both hands and pull into chest. Roll onto back and press arm straight up. Left arm and leg will be flat to the ground at a 45-degree angle. Right knee will be bent, right foot on the floor. Keeping gaze on kettlebell, press right foot into floor and roll onto left forearm. Next, extend left arm so that weight is planted into left hand. Sweep left leg back so that toes are tucked underneath foot and left knee rests on ground next to left hand on ground. Take left hand off floor and bring hips and shoulders to vertical. Square off hips, knees, and shoulders. Change gaze to look forward. Press into right heel and stand up to a fully locked out position. Reverse steps to get back down to floor. Alternate sides by dragging kettlebell on floor over head, lying on right side hugging kettlebell to chest.

 

Kettlebell Single Leg Deadlift (8 per side)

Stand with feet together and hold kettlebell with right hand in front of thigh, arm extended and palm facing left. Bend left knee slightly as you bend forward from hips, extending right leg to hip height behind you as you lower the kettlebell toward floor. Rise up to starting position and repeat. Switch sides.

Assisted Bodyweight Squat Hold (1 minute) 

Hold a bodyweight squat position with feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing forward. Turn feet out a bit if needed. Using an anchor (a bar or pole) for support, drive knees away from each other, and bring quads below parallel. Keep spine straight by pushing down with hands into anchor.

 

CIRCUIT 2

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes rest between rounds.

 

Bear Crawls Forward and Backward (25 meters)

Start on all fours on the ground (in a quadruped position). Lift knees off ground and crawl forward with right hand and left leg, then left hand and right leg.

 

ViPR Curtsy Lunge with Tilt (8 per side) 

Stand with feet together holding an upright ViPR with one end on the floor; both hands on the other side. Lunge left foot behind you as if you were going to curtsy. At the same time, tilt ViPR in same direction as back foot. Body creates ‘C.’ Keep spine long. Return to start; repeat on other side. Alternate sides. 

 

ViPR Lateral Lunge with Thoracic Rotation (8 per side)

Stand with feet together holding the ends of a ViPR to chest. Take a lunging step directly to right side. Keeping left leg long, sit back into right hip as you shift weight toward right side. Maintain position of lower body while rotating upper body right, ideally getting ViPR perpendicular to floor and ceiling. Drive off of right leg and step back to left leg to return to standing position. Repeat in opposite direction.

 

Cardio of your choice (5 minutes at 130 to 140 beats per minute)

 

Brettzel (1 minute per side)

Begin laying on right side with head supported by a foam pad. Take right hand and grab left knee, bringing it to belly button-height. Grab ankle of right leg behind back with left hand. Use a towel or strap if necessary. Inhale into belly, and on the exhale rotate toward left hand. Cycle through this progression a couple of times until shoulder is in contact with the ground. If it’s too difficult to get shoulder down, elevate flexed leg with towels. Repeat on the other side. 

 

COOL DOWN

 

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

 

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)

 

 


WORKOUT:

In the circuits below, monitor your heart rate to ensure it doesn’t go over 150 beats per minute*. If it does, take a rest in the finisher pose (a squat hold for 1 minute; a Brettzel, described below, for 2 minutes). For weighted moves, use a kettlebell that is 40 to 50 percent of what you’d use for your one rep max.

*If you do not have a heart rate monitor, you can use the "talk test." "If you can't hold a conversation, you are too winded and your heart rate is too high," says Jacobs. "The workout should never feel like more than a six out of 10 intensity-wise."

CIRCUIT 1

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes of rest between rounds.



1. Alternating Scorpion Reaches (6 per side)

Start in a push-up position. Bring the hips up and back into a V while the right foot travels in a circular motion out and your head pushes back between straight elbows. The right leg stays bent at 90 degrees while your left leg stays as long as possible. Think of opening the hips flat toward a wall behind you while pressing the right hand into the floor. Hold this position for about 5 seconds before returning to the start position and repeating on the opposite side.



2. Half Kneel Stretch with Rotation and Reach (8 per side)
Start with right knee on the ground directly under the hips with the left foot on the floor directly underneath the left knee. Place both hands behind your head with the elbows pressed back. Maintain this hip position while you rotate your right elbow toward the left, rotating the thoracic spine. Then, reach both arms toward the ceiling and slightly behind you. Return your hands behind the head, square your shoulders to the front, and repeat. 



3. Alternating Turkish Get Up (2 per side) 
Lying on right side, grip kettlebell with both hands and pull into chest. Roll onto back and press the left arm straight up, holding the kettlebell. Your right arm and leg will be flat to the ground at a 45-degree angle. Left knee will be bent, left foot on the floor. Keeping gaze on kettlebell, press left foot into floor and roll onto right forearm. Next, continue to roll up as you extend the right arm so that your body weight is planted into right hand. Sweep right leg back so that toes are tucked underneath foot and right knee rests on ground next to right hand on ground. Take right hand off floor and bring hips and shoulders to vertical. Square off hips, knees, and shoulders. Change gaze to look forward. Press into left heel and stand up to a fully locked out position. Reverse steps to get back down to floor. Alternate sides by dragging kettlebell on floor over head and lying on left side, hugging kettlebell to chest.



4. Kettlebell Single Leg Deadlift (8 per side)

Stand with feet together and hold kettlebell with right hand in front of thigh, arm extended and palm facing left. Bend left knee slightly as you bend forward from hips, extending right leg to hip height behind you as you lower the kettlebell toward floor. Rise up to starting position and repeat. Switch sides.



5. Assisted Bodyweight Squat Hold (1 minute) 

Hold a bodyweight squat position with feet shoulder-width apart, toes pointing forward. Turn feet out a bit if needed. Using an anchor (a bench or pole) for support, drive knees away from each other, and bring quads below parallel. Keep spine straight by pushing down with hands into anchor.

CIRCUIT 2

Complete 2 rounds with 2 minutes rest between rounds.



1. Bear Crawls Forward and Backward (25 meters)

Start on all fours on the ground (in a quadruped position). Lift hips into a V and crawl forward with right hand and left leg, then left hand and right leg.



2. ViPR Curtsy Lunge with Tilt (8 per side) 

Stand with feet together holding an upright ViPR with one end on the floor; both hands on the other side. Lunge left foot behind you as if you were going to curtsy. At the same time, tilt ViPR in same direction as back foot. Keep spine long. Return to start; repeat on other side. Alternate sides. 



3. ViPR Lateral Lunge with Thoracic Rotation (8 per side)

Stand with feet together holding the ends of a ViPR at chest height. Take a lunging step directly to right side. Keeping left leg long, sit back into right hip as you shift weight toward right side. Maintain position of lower body while rotating upper body right, ideally getting ViPR perpendicular to floor and ceiling. Drive off of right leg and step back to left leg to return to standing position. Repeat in opposite direction.

4. Cardio of your choice (5 minutes at 130 to 140 beats per minute)



5. Brettzel (1 minute per side)

Begin laying on right side with head supported by a foam pad or roller. Take right hand and grab left knee, bringing it to belly button-height. Grab toes of right leg behind back with left hand. (Use a towel or strap if necessary.) Inhale into belly, and on the exhale rotate toward left hand. Cycle through this progression a couple of times until shoulder is in contact with the ground. If it’s too difficult to get shoulder down, elevate flexed leg with towels. Repeat on the other side. 

COOL DOWN

Prone Diaphragmatic Breathing (3 minutes)

Targeted Self Myofascial Release (5 minutes)